Chicago Swami in Ireland – 1

Swami Ishatmananda Ji, the Head of Vivekananda Vedanta Society, Chicago arrived at Dublin on 2nd January 2019. His was the very first visit for the Dublin Eire Vedanta Society in the new Year 2019. After taking lunch and rest, he was taken to some important places in and around Dublin. He evinced great interest in seeing the Trinity College campus and the St Stephen’s Green wherein a statue of Indian Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore is maintained by the Park. The Christmas lightings were still available on the main streets of Dublin. On return, devotees were waiting for him to hear him speaking on “The Divine Grace”. A vesper service was held from 7:30 PM and immediately then Swami Purnananda Ji welcomed him and introduced him to the assembled audience. Swami Ishatmananda Ji spoke on the nature of Divine Grace and how we as devotees, should prepare ourselves so that we deserve the Grace.

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Christmas and Welcome Back Reception

The Ramakrishna Vedanta Centre at Dublin in Ireland celebrated Christmas in a holy atmosphere. The occasion was marked with a warm ‘Welcome Back’ Reception to Swami Vimokshananda on Sunday, 22 December 2018. He was earlier here in June 2018 when he was appointed as Minister in Charge of the new fledgeling Centre.
Carol songs were sung as part of Christmas Celebration. One devotee Mr Basil Conroy read out a part from the Gospel of St Luke that describes the divine birth of Jesus.

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Another devotee Mr Jeff Delmar read an inspiring article on the Love of Jesus comparing with the Love of Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi.
Swami Purnananda explained the significance of the passages from the readings to the audience. Swami Vimokshananda narrated the incident that happened at Antpur, West Bengal, India where Naren (later Swami Vivekananda) expounded on the wonderful life of sacrifice led by Jesus.
All devotees partook the prasad at the close of the Celebration. The shrine was tastefully decorated for the occasion when about 50 people gathered. A few children were also present who joined the carol singing.

Sri Jagaddhatri Stotram

Today, I remember with nostalgia the wonderful Sri Jagaddhatri Puja held every year at Ramakrishna Mission TB Sanatorium in Ranchi District. By Her grace, I had the best moments of my life by organising for twelve years, this mammoth function where more than twenty thousand people were given lunch prasad! Many devotees requested me for the Jagaddhatri Stotram which I reproduce below with English Transliteration. By reading this Stotram, the grace of Divine Mother Sri Jagaddhatri will be ours. Earlier this Blog has published two posts on Mother Jagaddhatri. Links are given below:

Joyous Jagaddhatri

Magnanimous Mother

श्री जगद्धात्री स्तोत्रम्

आधाररूपे चाधेये धृतिरूपे धुरन्धरे ।
ध्रुवे ध्रुवपदे धीरे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ १॥
शवाकारे शक्तिरूपे शक्तिस्थे शक्तिविग्रहे ।
शक्ताचारप्रिये देवि जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ २॥
जयदे जगदानदे जगदेकप्रपूजिते ।
जय सर्वगते दुर्गे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ३॥
सूक्ष्मातिसूक्ष्मरूपे च प्राणापानादिरूपिणि ।
भावाभावस्वरूपे च जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ४॥
कालाधिरूपे कालेशे कालाकालविभेदिनि ।
सर्वस्वरूपे सर्वज्ञे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ५॥
महाविघ्ने महोत्साहे महामाये वरप्रदे ।
प्रपञ्चसारे साध्वीशे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ६॥
आगम्ये जगतामाद्ये माहेश्वरि वराङ्गने ।
अशेषरूपे रूपस्थे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ७॥
तीर्थयज्ञ-तपोदान-य्योगसारे जगन्मयि ।
त्वमेव सर्वं सर्वस्थे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ८॥
दयारूपे दयादृष्टे दयार्द्रे दुःखमोचनि ।
सर्वापत्तारिके दुर्गे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ ९॥
आगम्यधाम-धामस्थे महायोगीश-हृत्पुरे ।
अमेयभावकूटस्थे जगद्धात्रि नमोऽस्तु ते ॥ १०॥

इति श्रीजगद्धात्रीस्तोत्रं सम्पूर्णम् ।

Sri Jagaddhatri Stotram

AdhArarUpe chAdheye dhRRitirUpe dhurandhare | 
dhruve dhruvapade dhIre jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 1 ||
shavAkAre shaktirUpe shaktisthe shaktivigrahe |
shAktAchAra priye devi jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 2 ||
jayade jagadAnande jagadeka prapUjjite |
jaya sarvagate durge jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 3 ||
sUkShmAti sukShmarUpe cha prANapAnAdi rUpiNi |
bhAvAbhAva svarUpe cha jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 4 ||
kAlAdirUpe kAleshe kAlAkAla vibhedini |
sarvasvarUpe sarvaGYe jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 5 ||
mahAvighne mahotsAhe mahAmAye varaprade |
prapanchasAre sAdhvIshe jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 6 ||
agamye jagatAmAdhye mAheshvari varA~Ngane |
asheSha rUpe rUpasthe jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 7 ||
tIrtha yaGYa tapodAna yogasAre jaganmayi |
tvameva sarvaM sarvasthe jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 8 ||
dayArUpe dayAdRRiShTe dayArdra duHkhamochani |
sarvApattArike durge jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 9 ||
agamyadhAma dhAmasthe mahAyogisha-hRRitpure |
ameyabhAva kUtasthe jagaddhAtri namo.astu te || 10 ||  

iti Sri Jagaddhatri stotram sampoornam |

Transliteration courtesy: Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay

A few snaps of Sri Jagadddhatri Puja of this year 2018 at Ramakrishna Mission TB Sanatorium, Ranchi 
Photos Courtesy: Debu Bhowmik, Ranchi

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“Deepavali” – Is Kali black?

“Deepavali” – Is Kali black?
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On Sunday, the 4th November 2018, brother monk Swami Shantatmananda requested me to deliver a Talk on the “Deepavali” Festival. It was held at the Sarada Auditorium. Deepavali is not a stand alone Festival as it is preceded by two other holy occasions and followed by another two holy occasions, thus can be in effect it is a Five-day Festival! I gave a synopsis of these five days’ occasions and went into introspective mode of discussing whether these five days can be imagined as linear progress in material and mental spheres of the human soul. While bringing up the topic of Kali Puja that is widely observed in the eastern parts of India on the Deepavali amavasya night, obviously the discussion veered round to a point of view on the subject of Mother Kali and the concept behind Her worship…
This lecture can be heard here:

A few snaps of that evening below:

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The Darknight Diwali Light

Hearty, Happy Diwali Greetings to every dear reader-devotee! May this Diwali lighten up your life, may it lighten down your burden and may it enlighten your intellect and lead you from dark alleys to Lighted path!

This is a repeat Post originally published in this blog on 26th October 2011.

 

Five-day Festival

Our world today is at the crossroads. While charity to help the poor and needy is delightfully increasing, it is disconcerting to see the rise of violence – domestic or national, crime, obscenity, corruption and other expressions of ill-gotten wealth. Serious people devoted to God and godly means of living are indeed worrying about the future prospects of their children. Is there, among the gloomy cloudiness, any shiny ray of hope?

It is in this context that the various celebrations that have come to us from time immemorial from the spiritual land of Bharat hold the clue. One of the most loved celebration of all the Hindus the world over, is the Festival of Lights – Diwali, also called Deepavali.

Sri Rama with Sita and Lakhshmana returning to Ayodhya by pushpak-vimaan

Diwali signifies lighting of lamps in every household on the Amavashya night that follows the bright fortnight after Vijaya Dashmi. No doubt this occasion marks joy and merriment. On the Diwali night, rows of lamps decorate the houses and presents are exchanged. Diwali, in the north of India, is associated with the coronation of Bhagawan Sri Rama when he returned to Ayodhya (in Uttar Pradesh) by pushpak-vimaan after vanquishing the demon King of Ceylon, Ravana on the day of Dasshera. Sri Ram had been in exile for fourteen years and the people were pleased to see and welcome back him with rows of lit lamps.

This festival of five days gives us, Hindus, an opportunity to go beyond all external extravaganza. First day marks Dhanteras meaning the thirteenth day of wealth.  It is also called Dhanwantari Triodashi indicating the adoration of Dhanwantari. He is the God of Medicine for the devatas and originator of Ayurveda science. The importance of keeping one’s physique in a healthy way cannot be over stated. As the ancient Sanskrit dictum says, “shareeram aadyam khalu dharma saadhanam” – body is the best means for practising dharma, taking steps to improve one’s health becomes mandatory.

Sri Krishna releasing 16 000 princesses from prison…

From here, with strong body, one has to ascend to the state of strong mind. Thus the second day, called naraka chaturdashi, is the fourteenth day signifying release of 16,000 princesses from prison by Sri Krishna. Bhagawan Sri Krishna encountered the demon Narakasura and killed him after granting his wish that on his death day people must celebrate with lighting of diya (lamps) in rows, taking oil bath, distributing sweet meats and burning firecrackers. We all do the latter part but do not pay attention in removing the darkness that has come to reside in our hearts! As Swami Vivekananda says, darkness in a sealed room over one thousand years will instantly vanish the moment a matchstick is lit. Knowledge of God is light. The ignorance  inside is darkness – a prison. 16,000 women are none but our 16,000 nadis to be liberated from impurity.

If body and mind are kept free from impurities, then only this life can be truly enjoyed. As the Isha Upanishad says “ tena tyaktena bhunjeetaah” – this life can be enjoyed when detachment comes. The mind searches for the purpose of life and it tries to fix the goal. Lakshmi word comes from lakshya meaning goal. Thus the third day which is the most important day of the five days of festival is spent in the worship of Goddess Lakshmi whose dazzling luminosity is represented by rows of lamps. What is the ultimate goal of life? Bhagawan Sri Ramakrishna clearly spells out the purpose of human birth. He says that a man is born in vain who inspite of having a human body, does not attempt to realise God! In eastern parts of Bharat, Goddess Kaali is worshipped. She is evidently invoked in order that our rakta (blood-attachment) is dried up (swallowed) and our munda (ego-head) can be cut asunder by Her grace.

Sri Krishna holding mount Govardhan – painting of Bikaner School of Art – Circa 1690

When God becomes the focus, all obstructions, sufferings, troubles come to an end. Did He not assure in Gita that His devotee is never destroyed? – na me bhaktah pranashyati. Thus the fourth day is important milestone in the spiritual development of a sadhaka when he/she is rest assured of the protection of the Lord. This day is remembered as Govardhanpuja signifying how Bhagawan Sri Krishna lifted with his small finger the massive Govardhan mountain in order to protect his people from the deluge of rain.

Progress in spiritual life has some definite signs. One of them is the cheerful attitude with which one serves all brothers and sisters. The amity that is brought forth among the sisters and brothers is practised on the final fifth day as bhaidhuj. As per puranas Yama, the Lord of Death has assured that he would not bother those mortals who spread the message of love to their sisters. A perfect harmony leads to moksha, the ultimate liberation.

Thus this ‘Five-day Festival’ traces the spiritual expansion of human growth culminating in the gaining of knowledge of God. It offers an opportunity to dive deep into one’s heart and search for all types of demonic qualities residing inside. Thus, the need is felt to clear the darkness from the heart. To dispel away the internal darkness we have to light the lamp of knowledge. When a lamp is lit on Diwali, just pray to your chosen ideal that the darkness of ignorance be removed from your heart.

In the Bhagavad Gita, Bhagawan Sri Krishna says that out of compassion for the devotees, He, residing within their hearts, certainly destroys the darkness born of ignorance with the radiant lamp of knowledge. (Ch X.11). Hence, while celebrating Diwali, let us pray to the Divinity (in whatever form one may believe in) to bestow the right knowledge by which we can lead a peaceful and prosperous life with service to the poor and needy.

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“Exit of Ego”

“Exit of Ego”
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On Sunday, the 28th October brother monk Swami Shantatmananda requested me to deliver a Talk on the “Exit of Ego”. The Sarada Auditorium at the New Delhi Centre was almost packed to full. Without going into intricacies of Vedantic view of Ego called Ahamkara, I chose to talk on four incidents – two from the recent past and two from the distant past. The first was about Late Swami Ritajananda Ji Maharaj, the Head of our Paris centre in the past – how the blooming ego could be nipped in the bud. The second was about Sister Nivedita – how the ego could be kept under control. The third was about Sri Hanuman Ji – how the ego was absolutely not allowed to raise its ugly head. The fourth was about Divine Mother Jagaddhatri – how the ego could be transformed by the knowledge of the Doer.
Do not worry if the Ego is present all the time and stubborn to exit;  “let the rascal ego remain as a servant” was the solution of Sri Ramakrishna!
This lecture can be heard here:

A few snaps of that evening below in a slideshow:

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